Corrosion Basics

Corrosion Basics: Engineering Materials

Although the primary focus of a corrosion engineer is on the chemical stability and corrosion resistance of these materials, it is critical to cooperate with other design team members familiar with the mechanical, physical, and other properties to ensure that the desired materials performance can be achieved.

Corrosion Basics: Effects of Coating on Corrosion and Cathodic Protection

The application of a coating can greatly reduce the amount of current required to obtain cathodic protection. In addition, good coating can significantly improve attenuation characteristics along a pipeline.

Corrosion Basics: Inhibitors for Waters of Low to Moderate Salt Concentrations

It is important to maintain inhibitor concentrations at a safe level in waters containing dissolved salts, particularly if these include chlorides.

Corrosion Basics: Coating Condition Surveys

Several elements of preplanning are necessary to effectively execute the condition survey. The first is a logical breakdown of the facility, and the second is to have a grading system to evaluate the observed conditions.

Corrosion Basics—Why Metals Corrode

Corrosion failures are often subtle and a result of invisible localized effects in the form of pits, intergranular corrosion, or attack within crevices.

Corrosion Basics—Safe Application of Protective Coatings

In every industrial environment, the safety factor is an important consideration. In some environments, including the application of protective coatings, it is of overriding importance. This article explores many of the safety factors that need to be considered.

Corrosion Basics—Corrosion Damage in Reinforced Concrete

The main causes of corrosion of steel in concrete are chloride attack and carbonation. These two mechanisms are unusual in that they do not attack the integrity of the concrete. Instead, aggressive chemical species pass through the pores in the concrete and attack the steel. This is unlike normal deterioration processes resulting from chemical attack on concrete.

Corrosion Basics—Types of Corrosive Atmospheres

Although atmospheres can be classified into four basic types, most of them are mixed and present no clear lines of demarcation. Furthermore, the type of atmosphere may vary with the wind pattern, particularly where corrosive pollutants are concerned.

Corrosion Basics—Corrosion Surveys

Two of the most fundamental and informative field measurements are soil resistivity surveys and pipe-to-soil potential surveys.

Corrosion Basics—Water Constituents

In water, the concentrations of various substances in dissolved, colloidal, or suspended form are typically low, but may vary considerably depending on the components and usage. For example, hardness values of up to 400 parts per million of calcium carbonate is sometimes tolerated in public supplies of potable water, whereas 1 ppm of dissolved iron would be unacceptable.

Corrosion Basics: Protecting Fixed Structures in Seawater

Steel structures such as bulkheads, piles, offshore drilling platforms, etc., may be protected with either sacrificial galvanic anode or impressed current cathodic protection systems.

Corrosion Basics: Special Cathodic Protection Requirements for Specific Pipeline Applications

Most pipeline cathodic protection applications involve either galvanic anode or impressed current systems installed in earth for protection of external surfaces.

Corrosion Basics: Testing Protective Coatings

Coating operations of almost any size must include some type of meaningful test program.

Corrosion Basics: Steam Generation in Power Plants

The greatest use of high-temperature water and steam is in electrical power generation.

Historic Corrosion Tools Tell the Story of Early Corrosion Control

A collection of antique instruments illustrates the rich history of the East Bay Municipal Utility District’s corrosion department.