Coatings & Linings

Di-Octyl Sebacic Acid in Epoxy Paint Leads to Blistering in a Drum and Barrel Manufacturing Plant

Di-octyl sebacic acid (DOS-A) is used as rust preventive oil on steel sheets. When applied below the maximum level of 75 mg/m2 per side, it is compatible with epoxy paint and does not require any pretreatment of the steel sheets. The incompatibility of DOS-A above this maximum could be caused by weak H-bonding between the acid and epoxy molecule, leading to blistering. The optimum oil level was determined through experimentation to avoid paint failure. It was also observed that a variance in the sheet surface roughness of ±0.4 µm did not appreciably affect paint failure.

It’s Not Just Paint—A Qualified Inspector Is Still Needed

The purpose of this article is to draw some attention to the importance of surface preparation and coating inspection and perhaps change some attitudes and the all-too-common practice of assigning less than qualified and experienced personnel to inspect surface preparation and coatings.

Recoating a Symbol of a City

The “Spoonbridge and Cherry” is an iconic sculpture in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Recently, concern was expressed over the condition of the cherry and its coatings. The cherry was inspected, removed, and recoated. This article describes the rehabilitation process and the materials used.

Application of Organic Coatings

Organic coatings include latex paints, plastics, asphaltic materials, rubbers, and elastomers. The specific material selected for a coating job must have characteristics that would allow its proper application under all conditions existing during the coating process. Proper identification of the physical or other properties of the film expected from the application must be specified.

Surface Preparation

Proper surface preparation is an essential preliminary step for any coating application. It is false economy to skimp on surface preparation in the belief that the coatings applied will compensate for surface deficiencies. This is especially true of high-performance coating materials.

Effects of Coating on Corrosion and Cathodic Protection

The four basic elements of a corrosion cell are an anode, a cathode, and the metallic and electrolytic pathways between them. Corrosion control can be achieved by eliminating (or reducing) any of these elements. One such method is to modify the electrolytic pathway by introducing a barrier between the threatened metal surface and the corrosive medium (i.e., by applying some kind of coating).

Protective Coatings

Applying an organic or metallic barrier coating between a corrosive environment and the material to be protected is a fundamental method of corrosion control. In fact, coatings and linings represent the most widely used method of protecting most metals.